Landscapes of Yellowstone - Evan Cobb | Independent Photographer & Videographer | Salt Lake City
Lower Yellowstone Falls, 2017.

Lower Yellowstone Falls, 2017.

Landscapes of Yellowstone

My first experience in Yellowstone was an overwhelming experience of visual markers that spoke to time as something both near and far. The steaming geysers in the light of dawn reminding us that our world is alive or the markings of wildfires that told us that we can't control everything. These lessons come from observing and learning about this powerful and important 2.2 million acres of protected land. 

The images in this post provide insight into the feeling that this place can offer for those who visit. For me, the feeling was of connection. This connection brought me out of my head and into a place that has been home to some amazing wildlife and natural wonders that are found in few places around the world.  

Gran Prismatic Springs, 2017.

Gran Prismatic Springs, 2017.

Dew covered meadow at dawn, 2017.

Dew covered meadow at dawn, 2017.

Due to Yellowstone being filled with wonderful and interesting things, the crowds come in hordes. I often found myself distracted by the other visitors and watching their experience in the park. Luckily, we were on a photo workshop with National Geographic Student Expeditions and our students were excited for the 5 a.m. departure times and the late night returns after blue hour passed. 


Because the world is becoming more accessible by more and more people, time of day is becoming even more important for finding a space for oneself. We also found amazing light, which helps when you are working with visuals. 

Reflections in Yellowstone, 2017.

Reflections in Yellowstone, 2017.

Yellowstone River at dusk, 2017.

Yellowstone River at dusk, 2017.

To go beyond making a snapshot of a landscape, the photographer must understand what the place is. For me, I have found that taking some time to wander the scene and do as much looking as I can before I saddle up to take a photo helps me leave out the snap shots and dive into more layered and storytelling imagery. This does mean that scenic stops take a bit more time for me compared to other folks. However, I find that these stops allow for me to stretch my legs, take deep breaths and truly begin to take in the landscape. For Yellowstone, this was essential in order to begin to wrap my head around this visual marker of time and it allowed for me to focus my photography on elements that spoke to this. 

Dawn in Yellowstone, 2017.

Dawn in Yellowstone, 2017.

All of these images (and others) will soon be available for purchase for personal prints. Stay tuned for more information on this and thank you for spending some time to learn more about my experience with Yellowstone, America's first national park.

Find more of my photography on my Instagram